Show/Hide
IMPORTANT
GCC responds to the Coronavirus Outbreak. GCC has moved to remote online instruction.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms, call your primary care physician or urgent care facility first. For the latest COVID-19 information from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health or call 211 (24/7).

 

GCC Calendar

POSTPONED: SLS SPRING 2020: READING THE RECORD OF FROST AND WIND AS IT SHAPES THE MARTIAN LANDSCAPE

  • Date: 03/24/2020 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM  
  • Location: CS 177

This event has been postponed.

This decision was made out of concern for the health of our community as a social distancing measure in light of COVID-19.

For updates on GCC response to the Coronavirus outbreak, please visit the COVID-19 information page.


3/24/2020 Science Lecture Series flyer

READING THE RECORD OF FROST AND WIND AS IT SHAPES THE MARTIAN LANDSCAPE

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2020
12:30−1:30PM • CS 177

SPEAKER:
DR. SERINA DINIEGA
Scientist/System Engineer, JPL

FLEX CREDIT AVAILABLE
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Sponsored by William Gohlke, in memory of OLE W. GOHLKE and STEPHANNE A. GOHLKE

Abstract:

Over the last decade, high-resolution images of Mars have shown that Mars is a very active world, with many surface features forming and evolving on seasonal timescales. Determining how these features change is important as this allows us to use them to estimate current and recent environmental conditions and active surface processes -- information that often cannot be acquired otherwise. For example, the dunes within the martian north polar erg have numerous alcove-apron features forming each Mars year. Based on when the changes occur (spoiler alert: during the Mars fall/winter) and the scale of activity observed within both the alcove-aprons and the dunes, we aim to learn more about wind-driven and polar/frost-related processes active over present-day Mars. Within this talk, several other examples of present-day martian surface activity will be shown and explored via the analysis of landforms and surface activity -- from migrating sand ripples to hovercrafting dry ice blocks. We'll also discuss how to link surface features with planetary conditions and history, and the challenges encountered in such studies

Bio:

Dr. Serina Diniega has loved math since she was a child and has been interested in space exploration since a visit to Johnson Space Center at the age of 12. As an undergraduate at Caltech, she found a way to combine both interests and decided to study the formation and evolution of planetary surfaces. She utilizes an interdisciplinary approach, using both geological insight and mathematical thinking while delving deep into the ways landforms evolve into specific patterns, shapes, and sizes. She received her PhD in Applied Mathematics at the University of Arizona where she explored dune and dune field pattern formation on the Earth and Mars. As a researcher at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), she looked into how lava flow dynamics evolve and form surface features on lava flows on the Earth, Mars, and Venus. She now works for the Europa Mission and the development of the Mars Exploration Program, as well as studying present-day surface activity on Mars. In addition to her research, she prioritizes encouraging students -- including women and minorities -- and the general public in STEM studies. She has a taught or mentored a wide variety of students (K-12 and undergraduate) in math, geology, and planetary science topics and research projects. 



Back to Current Science Lecture Series Schedule

Return to full list >>