Journalism

"The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth upon them."

-Ida B. Wells (1862-1931), an African-American journalist and activist who led an anti-lynching crusade in the 1890s

“A free press can be good or bad, but, most certainly, without freedom a press will never be anything but bad.”

- Albert Camus (1913-60), French journalist, author, and philosopher

"Journalism is an extraordinary and terrible privilege. Not by chance, if you are aware of it, does it consume you with a hundred feelings of inadequacy. […] Those who determine our destiny are not really better than ourselves; they are neither more intelligent nor stronger nor more enlightened than ourselves.”

- Oriana Fallaci (1929-2006), Italian journalist, author, political interviewer, and WWII anti-fascist resistance movement partisan

 

The notion of a free press is reflected in the First Amendment to the Constitution and sets this country apart from all others. "Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter," wrote Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), third president of the United States and principal author of the Declaration of Independence. Our right to know and need to know is preserved in journalism. As politicians, advocates, and commentators of all sorts beam their versions of wisdom towards the public, it is left to the journalist to look behind the moving curtain of lies, and serve his or her audience by inducing in them a skeptical frame of mind by holding fast to the truth.

Become a part of one of society's most important tradition by enrolling in journalism classes at Glendale Community College. You can learn to report and write the news, gain valuable experience that will apply in careers stretching from communications to PR, and hear from experts in the field. Our various journalism classes focus on newsgathering, reporting, newspaper design, photography, digital journalism, and teamwork. In our El Vaquero newspaper production classes, you can be the one to let your fellow students know about important news affecting their lives her on campus and in the surrounding communities.

For more information, email journalism instructor Rory Cohen at rcohen@glendale.edu or call her at (818) 240-1000 ext. 5214 

Journalism

Not all classes in all disciplines are offered every semester. See the Class Schedule or contact the Language Arts Division for offerings in the current semester.

NOTE For up-to-date course descriptions, please refer to the current GCC catalog.

Journalism 101

101 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATIONS 
(Also listed as Mass Communications 101) 
3.0 Units

JOURN 101 is an introductory course exploring the history, institutions, and social impact of mass communication media, including print, photography, recordings, film, television, computers, and the role of advertising and public relations. The course is taught from a perspective of theories of persuasion, the symbolic power of images, and the relationship between information and knowledge. Special attention is given to the impact of these media on how we live and believe as individuals and as a society. Lecture 3 hours.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 101.

Transfer Credit: CSU, UC, USC.

Journalism 102

102 REPORTING THE NEWS 
3.0 Units

JOURN 102 is an introductory course in the gathering and writing of news, features, and editorials. Students learn to write clearly and concisely via laboratory drills in English fundamentals. Topics of study include: news sources, acceptable forms for stories, style and method of various media, elementary editing, and law and ethics of communication. Newspapers and other media at the local community level as well as the national metropolitan levels are utilized. Lecture 3 hours/Laboratory 1 hour.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 101.

Course Typically Offered: Winter/Spring/ Summer/Fall.

Transfer Credit: CSU. (C-ID JOUR 110)

Journalism 103

103 STUDENT PUBLICATIONS STAFF 
3.0 Units

JOURN 103 is a course in writing news, feature, and editorial copy, copy reading and editing, headline writing, newspaper layout and make-up, and the mechanics of newspaper production. Students study laws and ethics of the press and there is an overall emphasis on the function and responsibility of the newspaper. Multiple formats are considered, including online and broadcast journalism. This course produces the campus newspaper, El Vaquero. Lecture 2 hours/ Laboratory 3 hours.

Recommended Preparation: JOURN 102 or equivalent; Eligibility for ENGL 101; LIB 191

Course Typically Offered: Fall/Spring.

Transfer Credit: CSU. (C-ID JOUR 130)

Journalism 104

104 STUDENT PUBLICATIONS EDITORS 
3.0 Units

JOURN 104 is an intermediate course in writing news, feature, and opinion articles; copy reading and editing; headline writing; newspaper layout and make-up; and the mechanics of newspaper production. There is an increased emphasis on in-depth reporting for print as well as online and broadcast media. There is further study of law and ethics of the press with an overall emphasis on the function and responsibility of the newspaper, internet and social media. There is also a greater emphasis on interpretative reporting. This course produces the campus newspaper, El Vaquero as well as the website for the paper, which includes a broadcast component. Social Media Platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are also implemented. Students in this class assume responsibility for editing and managing El Vaquero, the print and online editions. Lecture 2 hours/ Laboratory 3 hours.

Prerequisite: JOURN 103 or equivalent.

Course Typically Offered: Fall/Spring.

Transfer Credit: CSU. (C-ID JOUR 131)

Journalism 106

106 INTRODUCTION TO BROADCAST JOURNALISM I 
3.0 Units

JOURN 106 covers the process of gathering, writing, editing, and presenting the news on radio and television. Particular emphasis is placed on writing for broadcast, news judgment, visual considerations versus sound, interviewing techniques, ethics, scripting, and news organizations infrastructure. Lecture 3 hours/Laboratory 1 hour.

Prerequisite: None.

Course Typically Offered: Fall.

Transfer Credit: CSU.

Journalism 107

107 MAGAZINE WRITING 
3.0 Units

JOURN 107 focuses on feature writing for magazines and newspapers. Students learn how to find feature ideas and develop them into articles for student or professional publications. The creative story-telling side of journalism is stressed. The free-lance market for feature writers is discussed.

Note: This course is offered during the spring semester only. Lecture 3 hours.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 101.

Course Typically Offered: Spring.

Transfer Credit: CSU

Journalism 110

110 PHOTOJOURNALISM 
3.0 Units

JOURN 110 provides instruction in techniques for producing photos for news and feature articles. Students learn effective ways to take photos to accompany articles, as well as to use photos to tell a story of their own. Both conventional and digital photography are used. Lecture 2 hours/ Laboratory 3 hours.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 101 and PHOTO 101.

Course Typically Offered: Fall.

Transfer Credit: CSU. (C-ID JOUR 160)

Journalism 116

116 INTRODUCTION TO BROADCAST JOURNALISM II 
3.0 Units

JOURN 116 continues to develop the process of gathering, writing, editing, and presenting the news on radio and television. This course involves practical application of the skills. Students produce, report, and anchor a news segment for cable broadcast. In addition, they will produce and host a half-hour magazine format show for cable broadcast. Emphasis is placed on writing for broadcast, new judgment, visual versus sound considerations, interviewing techniques, ethics, scripting, and new organizations’ infrastructure. Students will also be introduced to various radio formats and perform on the campus radio station. Lecture 3 hours/Laboratory 1 hour.

Prerequisite: JOURN 106 or equivalent. 

Journalism 210

210 ADVANCED NEWS WRITING
3.0 Units

JOURN 210 emphasizes public affairs reporting. Students will cover public meetings both on and off campus, including trials, school board meetings, and city council meetings. They will also contribute to the college newspaper, El Vaquero. The emphasis is on print journalism, but students will also be exposed to broadcasting, the Internet, and podcasting. Emphasis will be given to journalistic law and ethics. Lecture 3 hours/Laboratory 1 hour.

Prerequisite: JOURN 102 or equivalent.

Course Typically Offered: Spring

Transfer Credit: CSU. (C-ID JOUR 210)

Journalism 250

250 VISUAL COMMUNICATION
3.0 Units

JOURN 250 surveys the most significant techniques and examples of visual communication employed in the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, television, the Internet, and advertising. The course is designed to lead students to an understanding of the possibilities of visual communication in the mass media. The course exposes students to both practitioners and scholars in the field to demonstrate how the media use images and how the students might incorporate visual images into their own work. Students develop their critical thinking skills by learning the language and theory of visual media. Lecture 3 hours/Laboratory 1 hour.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 101.

Course Typically Offered: Spring.

Transfer Credit: CSU. (C-ID JOUR 170)