The Child Development and Education Department educates and prepare students to work with young children and their families in a variety of roles and settings including elementary schools, state and federally funded children's programs, private and public infant care, preschool and after school programs, and family child care homes. Child Development majors may also transfer to 4 year colleges and universities to continue their preparation to become Transitional Kindergarten or Early Elementary school teachers.

Housed in the Child Development Laboratory School, one of the strengths of the Early Childhood Education program is its integration with GCC's nationally accredited Laboratory School.

We offer an AS degree in Child Development, and an AS-T in Early Childhood Education.

Degree and Certificate Options

AS degree in Child Development/AS-T in Early Childhood Education 
The degree or certificate options are designed to support and encourage the professional development of students who aim for a career in: Infant, Toddler, and/or Preschool Education; School Age Child Care; and/ or Early Childhood Administration and Supervision. Each certificate is aligned with the California Child Development Permit, which is issued through the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The permit enables an educator to move along a career ladder which supports a hierarchy of professional goals and competencies relative to employment and leadership. 

Elementary Teacher Education degree for Transfer
The elementary education degree is designed to prepare students to transfer to a four-year university with an Associate Degree in Elementary Teacher Education. Students will compete the lower-division requirements, including pre-professional supervised experience. Along with their general education requirements, students will study how children develop as well as the theories and practices associated with teaching elementary school.

101 INTRODUCTION TO ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM TEACHING
CHLDV 101 introduces students to the concepts and issues related to teaching diverse learners in today’s contemporary schools, Transitional Kindergarten through Grade 6. Topics include teaching as a profession and career, historical and philosophical foundations of the American education system, contemporary educational issues, California’s content standards and frameworks, and teacher performance standards. In addition to class time, the course requires a minimum of 45 hours of supervised field- work in public school elementary school classrooms that represent California’s diverse student population, and includes cooperation with at least one campus approved and selected certificated classroom teacher.

133 OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT
CHLDV 133 focuses on the appropriate use of assessment and observation strategies to document development, growth, play and learning in order to join with families and professionals in promoting children’s success and maintaining quality programs. Record- ing strategies, rating systems, portfolios, and multiple assessment methods are explored. Note: Verification of tuberculosis (TB) clearance required.

135 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
CHLDV 135 examines the major physical, psychosocial, and cognitive/language developmental milestones for children, both typical and atypical, from conception through adolescence. There will be an emphasis on interactions between maturational processes and environmental factors. While studying developmental theory and investigative research methodologies, students will observe children evaluate individual differences and analyze characteristics of development at various stages

137 SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN IN CHILD CARE
CHLDV 137 is designed for students interested in working in before and after school or out-of-school programs for children aged 5-12. The course introduces School Age program philosophies and program types, examines needs and concerns relating to school-age children in child care and strategies for managing classrooms and guiding children’s behavior. Knowledge of develop- mental ages and stages is emphasized. This course includes designing developmentally appropriate curriculum and experiences for school age children and creating developmentally appropriate environments.

138 HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION
CHLDV 138 introduces the laws, regulations, standards, policies and procedures and early childhood curriculum related to child health, safety and nutrition. The characteristics of good health and the recognition of the symptoms of communicable diseases are examined. The habits and attitudes essential for physical and mental health of teachers, parents and children are identified. This course is intended to examine the current concepts in the field of health, safety and nutrition and their relationship to the young child and program planning. Emphasis is given to the components of quality care for young children and the importance of collaboration with families and health care professionals.

140 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF TEACHING
CHLDV 140 examines the underlying theoretical principles of developmentally appropriate practices applied to programs, environments, emphasizing the key role of relationships, constructive adult-child inter- actions, and teaching strategies in supporting physical, social, creative and intellectual development for all children. This course includes a review of the historical roots of early childhood programs and the evolution of the professional practices promoting advocacy, ethics and professional identity. Note: Verification of tuberculosis (TB) clearance required.

141 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR
CHLDV 141 provides for a demonstration of developmentally appropriate early child- hood teaching competencies under guided supervision. Students utilize practical classroom experiences to make connections between theory and practice, develop professional behaviors, and build a comprehensive understanding of children and families. Child centered, play-oriented approaches to teaching, learning, and assessment; and knowledge of curriculum content areas is emphasized as student teachers design, implement and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for all young children. Note: Verification of current tuberculosis (TB) clearance required.

142 CHILD, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY
CHLDV 142 examines the developing child in a societal context focusing on the interrelationship of family, school and community with an emphasis on historical and socio-cultural factors. The processes of socialization and identity development will be highlighted, showing the importance of respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families.

147 WORKING WITH INFANTS AND TODDLERS
CHLDV 147 is designed to provide specialization in the milestones of infant and toddler development, and the various programs currently available. Students consider principles of care-giving, and learn appropriate play activities and materials necessary to enhance early childhood education. Observation of infants and toddlers is required, both in the classroom and outside in the community.

150 INTRODUCTION TO CURRICULUM
CHLDV 150 provides an overview of principles involved in planning, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate curriculum. It includes processes for planning and implementing developmentally appropriate environments and experiences; selection of appropriate materials, emerging curriculum, scheduling, room arrangement, and planning developmentally appropriate activities and curricula for young children from birth to age eight in child care and early childhood development settings. Included are focuses on children’s play, the role of assessment, webbing, activity planning, daily scheduling and curriculum areas such as art, science, math, literature, music, language arts, and dramatic play are examined. Note: Verification of tuberculosis (TB) clearance required.

152 MUSIC FOR YOUNG CHILDREN
CHLDV 152 explores musical experiences appropriate to the development of the infant, the preschool child, the elementary school child, and the exceptional child.

154 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND THE ART EXPERIENCE
CHLDV 154 provides students with the basic knowledge of the content and style of children’s art and its link to thinking. Emphasis is placed on the developmental areas of children’s growth and the ways teachers can provide appropriate and stimulating experiences. Students have the opportunity to merge theory and practice and gain skills to facilitate creative expression. Experiential learning will be implemented and students will have the opportunity to explore with art materials and then analyze those experiences through a developmental lens. Inclusion, diversity, and the Reggio Emilia approach are featured.

155 CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
CHLDV 155 provides instruction in identifying normal and special development of children, and includes methods of management and teaching techniques which prove helpful in working with children with special needs. A humanistic view of the whole child and the valuing and supporting of his/her rights is emphasized. The class includes discussions about parents of exceptional or special children, along with educational services and community agencies.

156 TEACHING IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY
CHLDV 156 examines the development of social identities in diverse societies includ- ing theoretical and practical implications of oppression and privilege as they apply to young children, families, programs, classrooms and teaching. Various classroom strategies will be explored emphasizing culturally and linguistically appropriate anti-bias approaches supporting all children in becoming competent members of a diverse society. Course includes self-examination and reflection on issues related to social identity, stereotypes and bias, social and educational access, media and schooling. Note: Verification of current tuberculosis (TB) clearance required.

158 MOVEMENT DEVELOPMENT: BIRTH THROUGH TWELVE YEARS
CHLDV 158 focuses on designing develop- mentally appropriate creative dance experiences for young children. It provides those students who are interested in teaching movement to children the opportunity to acquire knowledge and techniques related to motor development and use of creative dance to explore subjects across the early childhood and early elementary curriculum. The course introduces basic principles and theories of motor development in children from birth to age twelve, focusing on designing developmentally-appropriate and creative dance experiences for young children. 

160 GUIDING CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS
CHLDV 160 is a course that focuses on the processes, techniques, models, research, and selected issues in child guidance as applied to 0-adolescence in family and community settings. Students will develop a personal approach to guidance based on current scientific research and theory concerning human development.

174 ADMINISTRATION OF EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS I
CHLDV 174 is an introduction to the administration of early childhood programs. Topics covered include general responsibilities of a program director, program types, developing and managing program budgets, program management skills, an examination of relevant laws and regulations governing early childhood programs, and the development and implementation of policies and procedures. The course also examines administrative tools, philosophies, and techniques needed to organize, open and operate an early care and education program.

175 ADMINISTRATION OF EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS II
CHLDV 175 explores effective strategies for personnel management and leadership in early care and education settings, including legal and ethical responsibilities, supervision techniques, professional development, and reflective practices for a diverse and inclusive early care and education program. Comprehensive methods for analyzing the different components of an early childhood program to effect organizational change are discussed. Particular emphasis is on the art of leadership and interpersonal relationships.

176 MENTOR TEACHER PRACTICES
CHLDV 176 is designed to examine the methods and principles of supervising student teachers, entry level teachers, volunteers and other adults in early care and education settings. Emphasis is on the roles and development of early childhood professionals as mentors and leaders. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHLDV 141 or equivalent.

180 STUDENT TEACHING FIELD PRACTICE - INFANT/TODDLER FOCUS
CHLDV 180 provides a semester teaching experience in an infant/toddler setting. The teacher candidate, under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor, assumes complete responsibility for the instruction of children. The course is designed to provide opportunities for practical application of skills and knowledge previously gained in the classes specified in the infant/toddler and child development curriculum. Field experience provides the teacher candidate the opportunity to participate in classroom activities, design and teach a developmentally appropriate focus under the guidance of the supervising/mentor teacher, assess themselves as a prospective teacher, and participate in seminar discussions. The environment and routines are emphasized as an integrating context for planning instruction.

181 STUDENT TEACHING FIELD PRACTICE - PRESCHOOL FOCUS
CHLDV 181 provides a semester teaching experience in a preschool setting. The teacher candidate, under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a college super- visor, assumes complete responsibility for the instruction of children. The course is designed to provide opportunities for practical application of skills and knowledge previously gained in the classes specified in the preschool and child development curriculum. Field experience provides the teacher candidate the opportunity to participate in classroom activities, design and teach a developmentally appropriate focus under the guidance of the supervising/mentor teacher, assess themselves as prospective teachers, and participate in seminar discussions.

182 STUDENT TEACHING FIELD PRACTICE - SCHOOL AGE FOCUS
CHLDV 182 provides a semester teaching experience in a school age setting. The teacher candidate, under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a college super- visor, assumes complete responsibility for the instruction of children. The course is designed to provide opportunities for practical application of skills and knowledge previously gained in the classes specified in the school age and child development curriculum. Field experience provides the teacher candidate the opportunity to participate in before and after-school activities, design and provide developmentally appropriate activities and tutoring under the guidance of the supervising/mentor teacher, assess themselves as a prospective teacher, and participate in seminar discussions.

210 SCAFFOLDING LEARNING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
CHLDV 210 compares current cognitive theories and provides methods for bridging the gap between research and classroom practice. Strategies and skills necessary to preparing environments that encourage active learning and problem-solving skills for children are developed. Particular emphasis is given to the project approach to implementation, using the acclaimed 
innovative Reggio Emilia techniques.